Datasets

This page provides an overview of several datasets I have been working on in the past years. They are the result of an extensive data collection effort that started in 2017, intending to bring together data on climate-related financial policies that were not previously available or dispersed across various sources.

Computer code by Markus Spiske is licensed under CC-CC0 1.0

Data on climate-related financial policies in G20 countries

(latest update: Dec. 2021)

This dataset covers data on climate-related financial policies in G20 countries (excluding EU) and focused on the period 2000-2020.

The database is available here. Further information is available upon request.

Figure: Climate-related (green) financial policymaking in the G20 from 2000–2020. Source: D’Orazio, Climate Policy, 2021

How to cite?

D’Orazio, Paola (2021): Data on climate-related financial policies in G20 countries. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.16358961.v1

This database is used in:

D’Orazio, P. (2022). Mapping the emergence and diffusion of climate-related financial policies: Evidence from a cluster analysis on G20 countries. International Economics, 169, 135-147.

D’Orazio, P., & Popoyan, L. (2022). Realising Central Banks’ Climate Ambitions Through Financial Stability Mandates. Intereconomics, 57(2), 103-111.

D’Orazio, P. (2021). Towards a post-pandemic policy framework to manage climate-related financial risks and resilience. Climate Policy, 21(10), 1368-1382.

D’Orazio, P., & Dirks, M. W. (2022). Exploring the effects of climate-related financial policies on carbon emissions in G20 countries: a panel quantile regression approach. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 29(5), 7678-7702.

Pandemic-related financial policies in G20 countries

(latest update: Dec. 2021)

This database is built by reviewing the pandemic-related prudential policies from three different sources, namely:

– the IMF database “Policy responses to Covid-19”

– the World Bank “Covid-19 pandemic: A database of policy responses related to the financial sector”

– the “Covid-19 financial response tracker” provided by the Yale Program on Financial Stability

The focus is on the policies adopted by G20 countries in the period March-December 2020.


The review resulted in the collection of 737 data points.

Information is provided on the country, region, income level, date of the start and end of the policy (when available), description, and reference.


This database is used for the review of pandemic-related financial policies in the paper “Addressing climate-related financial risks and enhancing financial resilience in a post-pandemic framework: A review of existing policies and future perspectives“.

The database is available here.

How to cite?

D’Orazio, Paola (2021): Pandemic-related financial policies in G20 countries. figshare. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.14706444.v2

 
 

Figure: Financial measures adopted in the G20 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic between March and December 2020. Source: D’Orazio, Climate Policy, 2021

 

Dataset on green macroprudential regulations (latest update: 2018)

(joint with L. Popoyan)

The dataset (presented in this article) contains the data gathered when surveying the existing “green” macroprudential regulations and instruments. Official central banks’ documents, as well as financial institutions reports, have been considered. In particular, for the selected high, middle and low-income countries surveyed, the dataset contains information on the type of regulation, the institution responsible for its implementation or promotion, the official reference and the related link to the document as of October 2018.

The dataset is available here.

 

Value of the data

• The dataset is of use for the scientific community as it is the first centralized collection of public data on the usage of green macroprudential tools, their juridical reference, and objective, as well as central banks’ governance type and mandates.

• The data can be used to identify and understand current and future trends, and the role of central banks and regulators, in sustainable finance.

• The green macroprudential dataset and statistics presented in this article are critical to understanding the direction and diffusion of greening prudential regulations, and the role of central banks in the low-carbon transition.

• It is essential that data on the usage and diffusion of green prudential tools are updated and made available to the researchers, considering the actively evolving debate on the adoption of such instruments and their implementation in different institutional setup worldwide.

GMP.pngFigure: The diffusion of green macroprudential regulation according to the Green macroprudential index (GMI). Source: D’Orazio and Popoyan, Data in Brief, 2019

How to cite?

D’Orazio, P., & Popoyan, L. (2019). Dataset on green macroprudential regulations and instruments: Objectives, implementation and geographical diffusion. Data in brief, 24, 103870. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.103870  

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